Abbreviations

ad inf., ad infinitum, to infinity, on and on.

ad int., ad interim, in the meantime, meanwhile.

ad lib., ad libitum, at pleasure.

c., circa, about, approximately. It's used with dates.

cf., confer, compare. Does not mean "see" as in "See pages 8-10 for a full discussion of this point."

chap., chapter

cont., continued

ed., edited by; edition; editor. The plural is "eds."

e.g., exempli gratia, for example. Use commas before and after it.

et al., et alii, and others. Since "et" is a complete Latin word ("and"), don't put a period after it.

et seq., et sequentes, et sequentia, and the following. Since "et" is a complete Latin word ("and"), don't put a period after it.

etc., et cetera, and so forth. "Etc." is preceded by a comma.

f., and the following page or line. The plural is "ff." Avoid this abbreviation in favor of listing the lines or pages, or the ranges.

ibid., ibidem, in the same place. "Ibid." is used in footnotes to specify the same title as the one cited in the immediately preceding note.
    See: Ibid. and Op. Cit.

i.e., id est, that is. Use commas before and after it.

N.B., nota bene (singular), notate bene (plural), note well, please note, take notice.

op. cit., opere citato, in the work cited. "Op. cit." is sometimes used in footnotes to eliminate the need for repeatedly writing out a long title.
    See: Ibid. and Op. Cit.

p., page. The plural is "pp."

pub., published by.

viz., videlicet, namely. Use commas before and after it.

vol., volume. The plural is "vols."

vs., versus, against, versus.


Last updated 6:56:36 PM PST, Saturday, March 8, 2008